Day 9 + 40 Days of Mercy + + +

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There was once a prophet Micah, (as told about in the Hebrew scriptures), who had much to say to the political, religious, and business leaders in positions of power. He chastised them for their greed, corruption, dishonesty, oppression of the poor, and neglect for God’s ways.

Here’s just one bit of what he said:

“Alas for those who devise wickedness and evil deeds on their beds!
When the morning dawns, they perform it, because it is in their power.
They covet fields, and seize them; houses, and take them away;
they oppress householder and house, people and their inheritance. . .”
(Micah 2:1-2)

Then Micah challenges the leaders to return to God’s way
with these words that we often quote:

“He has told you, O mortal, what is good;
and what does the Lord require of you
but to do justice, and to love mercy,
and to walk humbly with your God?”
(Micah 6:8)

“Justice” is about fairness and equality for all.
This “mercy” is about acting with loving kindness.
“Walking humbly” is in contrast to those who act
in arrogance without acknowledging God’s help.

Dear people ~
In this season of Lent + these 40 Days of Mercy,
may we seek to do what the Lord requires of us . . .
To balance our desire for justice with acts of mercy . . .

Let us pray for those in positions of power
that they may have compassion for the oppressed
and choose:

Grace over greed
Faith over fear
Love over hate

and walk humbly with our God of Grace.

Anna Lin +

Image is from Repairers of the Breach on Facebook

What is Truth? The Hyena Story

What is Truth?

Truth goes beyond the facts of this world. Truth is based on faith.
Truth is felt with our whole being.
It can be a joyful, exuberant feeling . . . like when we see the miracle of life in a new born child, or know the cherished love of someone dear.

There is a story full of truth about a classroom in a mission school in Africa . . . Kenya.
The school was located on the edge of the community.
It was near the town, so that students came from both the bush and the town to study there.
The town students came wearing their fancy Western clothes and carrying their brief cases . . . strutting proudly into the classroom.
The students from the bush walked timidly in.
They carried no brief case. They had no new clothes.

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